New Toyota Mirai: next-gen hydrogen fuel cell car revealed

New Toyota Mirai

Toyota led the world with the introduction of the hydrogen-powered Mirai in 2014 – a model that has spearheaded global awareness of how a clean and sustainable society built around hydrogen energy might be achieved in the future.

Now we are getting ready to take our advanced zero-emission fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) technology to new heights with the second-generation Mirai. First seen at last year’s Tokyo motor show, the striking new four-door has now been shown in a new guise at the Kenshiki Forum in Amsterdam.

New Toyota Mirai

Scheduled for launch in 2020, initially in Japan, North America and Europe, the new Mirai will be much more than an eco-car, showing how its FCEV technology is no barrier to creating a vehicle that is rewarding to drive and beautiful to look at.

New Toyota Mirai

Efficiency is still a critical area, and we are targeting a 30% increase in driving range through improvements to the fuel cell system and use of larger on-board hydrogen tanks. There are now three tanks – one long, two short – which together increase the fuel capacity by around one kilo of hydrogen compared to the current model.

New Mirai: immediate impact

Yoshikazu Tanaka, chief engineer of the new Mirai, said: “We have pursued the goal of making a car that customers will feel they want to drive all the time, a car that has an emotional and attractive design, and the kind of dynamic and responsive performance that can bring a smile to the driver’s face.

New Toyota Mirai

“I want customers to choose the Mirai not just because it’s an FCEV, but because [they] simply wanted this car and it just happens to be an FCEV. We will continue our development work focusing on that feeling, and we hope that the new Mirai will be a leader in helping realise a hydrogen energy society.”

New Toyota Mirai

The exterior design of the new Mirai creates an immediate impact, with low lines, elegant proportions and taut bodywork rolling on 20-inch diameter wheels.

New Toyota Mirai

The interior has been conceived as a simple, modern space with a comfortable ambience which exudes the feeling that this is a car that’s genuinely enjoyable to drive and travel in. Key elements include a 12.3-inch centre display and an instrument panel that wraps around the driver. The platform and intelligent packaging allow for five seats, instead of the current Mirai’s four.

New Toyota Mirai

The fact that the new Mirai is constructed on Toyota’s latest rear-wheel drive modular platform – itself engineered to accommodate a hydrogen fuel cell from the start – has given the development team the freedom to craft a more emotional, head-turning design. It also gives the new Mirai a higher degree of body rigidity and a lower centre of gravity, which contributes to greater agility and responsiveness, and therefore more nimble, rewarding handling.

New Toyota Mirai

As well as extending the potential driving range, improvements in fuel cell performance endow the new Mirai with a smooth linearity between driver inputs and vehicle responsiveness. The handling is light and easy on winding roads, while highway driving produces an exceptional sense of power at all speeds.

New Mirai preview model – outline specifications
Overall length (mm) 4,975
Overall width (mm) 1,885
Overall height (mm) 1,470
Wheelbase (mm) 2,920
Drivetrain Rear-wheel drive
Passenger capacity Five
Driving range Approx. 30% greater than current model

Comments (13)

  1. Such an exciting time in the history of the ‘Automobile’. This 2nd generation Mirai is a very bold move and I recon people will want this care for it’s looks and Lexus like interior and not just it’s fuel cell tec. Will it have a low speed battery/hybrid drive like the current model and will Toyota consider improving the Kwh capacity for greater flexibility around town? Please don’t price it out of reach of 99% of us!

    1. Hi Michael,
      Thanks for getting in touch with us. We also love the Mirai’s attractive design.
      The new Mirai will have hydrogen fuel cell technology similar to the current model and will have a 30% greater driving range than the current generation.
      We currently don’t have any more information to share, but keep an eye on our blog and social channels for the latest updates!
      Thanks.

  2. I followed a link t here because in a year or so I will be looking for an EV, and (subject to fuel availability outside London) would prefer hydrogen fuel cell . . . but not this, its just too big. Lets hope I rediscover your advertising when you have a hydrogen vehicle no bigger than a Yaris, and preferably slightly shorter.

  3. Hello,
    B9 Energy is developing a pilot electrolyser plant in Belfast that will produce up to 60kg/d of H2 at 350bar. Ideally we would like to use an HGV tractor unit(s) but would consider several cars if they are compatible and available.
    Kind Regards
    David

  4. I am all for choice when it comes to replacing petrol and diesel vehicles, however this is more a niche product rather than a one which will become common place as there is demand in introducing a hydrogen fuelling network throughout the UK.

    I have bought Toyotas for over 15 years and only recently swapped to a brand new yaris Hybrid GR Sport and although it looks nice it drives awful. The engine stays in far too low of a gear when demanding power making the engine scream as you pull away quick from a busy junction and want to pick up speed.

    Sadly it looks like the new Toyota Yaris GR Sport wont be available as an EV model. Toyota are lacking where others are thriving and investment in battery technology should be huge. If we could get a Yaris EV for the same price as petrol versions and a range if 200 miles per charge it would change the way we drive.

    Unless the nee yaris comes in an EV model over next couple if years I will be switching to one or the many smaller cars that have recently come out that are full EV.

    1. Hi Keith,

      Thanks for getting in touch. All our hybrids, like the Yaris GR Sport have a CVT transmission (continually variable).The CVT in our hybrids work to find the most efficient gear ratio at any given moment, and it may just be that you need time to get used to the Continually variable transmission. Have you ever driven a hybrid before?

      Regarding our electrification strategy, by around 2025, every model in the our line-up will be available either as a dedicated electrified model or have an electrified option. You can read more about this here: https://blog.toyota.co.uk/electrification-across-entire-toyota-line-up-from-2025

      Thanks.

    1. Where can you refill this car in the UK? If the range is 400 miles will have i have to drive 200 miles to get a refill? I certainly can’t refill at home? So I drive to a station with 10% fuel left. When I swap tanks do I get a refund for the 10% tank I have surrendered at the filling station? It appears to be a BIG risk to buy this type of fuel system. EV’s can be charged at most locations and it’s growing. Bu they can be changed at home. this decentralized system make’s the future EV network more desirable for consumers. Hydrogen would be fine for buses, trucks, trains and ships but who is manufacturing that much hydrogen at this time? No one!

      1. Hi there,

        Thanks for getting in touch. There are currently 11 hydrogen refuelling stations in the UK. We acknowledge that at this time refueling stations are mainly focused around London, however, both the Met Police and Green Tomato cars are having great success with their Mirai https://fal.cn/347M0 & https://fal.cn/347M2

        The Mirai is part of our belief that there is currently no single solution and you can read more about why Toyota chose to make hydrogen cars here: https://blog.toyota.co.uk/why-does-toyota-make-hydrogen-cars

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.